Book Review: To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee’s high school reading curriculum staple is told through the eyes of Jean Louise “Scout” Finch, a young girl growing up in 1930s Alabama, where money is scarce and racism is rife. The first half of the story follows the exploits of Scout, her brother Jem, and their friend Dill. We meet charming and... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Swann’s Way

This book took me three years and three attempts to finish. On my first attempt at Volume One of Marcel Proust’s epic masterwork, À la recherche du temps perdu, I failed to get past page three. The writing was difficult and bland, so I gave up. Later I tried again, this time with an English... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Frankenstein

 Mary Shelley apparently premised this monster novel on a dream she had about a scientist. I’ve got to hand it to her; dream-based fiction is a tough genre to write. I tried it once, and the result was a critically panned three hundred pages about me having a conversation at a theme park with a... Continue Reading →

Book Review: The Hound of the Baskervilles

 Sherlock Holmes is a character that has been loved by readers ever since his introduction back in (check date before publishing). His eccentricity and genius have entertained millions, and have been translated to the stage and screen in many forms, including a recent, award-winning BBC television series starring Bernadette Chamberpot (I know that’s not right—check... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Slaughterhouse Five

Before reading a book, I like to guess what it will be about based on the title. I’ve been pretty close to the mark with some books, such as: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Three men in a Boat, and The Beginner’s Guide to Taxation Accounting. Judging Kurt Vonnegut’s most famous novel by its cover,... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Lord of the Flies

Tales of castaways on desert islands have always been popular. They usually focus on mankind’s strength of spirit and ingenuity, as stranded heroes master their surroundings and overcome the odds to survive. William Golding takes a different approach in his famous novel. Imagine the movie Castaway, except instead of Tom Hanks playing a bearded man... Continue Reading →

Book Review: The Time Machine

H.G. Wells was a trailblazer when it came to science fiction, making technological predictions in his writing that turned out to be remarkably close to the truth over a century later. I wish I had even half his gift of foresight; oh, to see the utopian future predicted in my own science fiction novel The... Continue Reading →

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