And There Was Ninja Moustache (Chapter 11)

The train ride from the airport was pleasant to begin with; outside the window, white clouds drifted through blue skies, while frangipanis bloomed amid the trees whizzing by. Rory regaled me with humorous stories from his prison stay—the humour was black, of course. Very black. The inventiveness of some of the prisoner suicides disturbed me.... Continue Reading →

And There Was Ninja Moustache (Chapter 8)

After we passed through customs, Rory said he was peckish, so he and I stopped at a little airport coffee shop plastered with Italian flags and paintings of the Colosseum, called Caffè di Venezia. Rory ordered a ham and cheese croissant, Vegemite toast, bacon and eggs and an orange juice; I ordered a chocolate milkshake.... Continue Reading →

And There Was Ninja Moustache (Chapter 3)

In the timid glow of my rental car’s stereo display I watched the night outside. It was dark—too hopeless even for stars. A sliver of moon now and then appeared through the drifting sea of clouds, painting a pale silver outline on the treetops. Behind the giant relic projector screen, the forest grew unchecked, as... Continue Reading →

And There Was Ninja Moustache (Chapter 1)

 “Man’s most striking shortcoming is his eagerness to convince himself of nonsense. This is also his greatest strength.” —Elroy “Bubba” Fowpend   From diverse eyewitness accounts, unsteady video footage, police reports, second-hand gossip and my own hazy recollections, I have painstakingly reassembled the events of Rory’s fortieth-birthday weekend. It is what it is. I got... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Darkness at Noon

It seems communism is much like Samson from the bible—it killed a lot of people and left those it spared with a deep distrust and resentment toward it. My friend Neil is also like Samson, in that he has long hair and lives with his parents. But no one has written a book about Neil... Continue Reading →

Book Review: The Communist Manifesto

Whoever said Germans don’t have a sense of humour had obviously never heard of the comedy duo Marx and Engels. The pair’s satirical works may be over a hundred and fifty years old, but their style is a refreshing change from most modern political humour in that it is actually funny. Their most famous piece... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Animal Farm

History can be a touchy subject, and art is a risky medium. When George Orwell used a story about farm animals to portray the Russian Communist Revolution and Joseph Stalin’s bloody reign, he was considered brilliant; but when I put on a puppet show about the French Revolution (complete with miniature guillotine), I was branded... Continue Reading →

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