Short Fiction: Clem’s Harvest

Clem stood on the balcony and surveyed the cornfields: tall, ripe, peaceful green, as far as he could see. Twenty-two years he had worked his farm, and this looked like the crop that would finally make him some money. All he had to do was keep his pyromania in check. Wendy came out and stood... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Charlotte’s Web

For decades children and adults alike have adored E. B. White’s tale of a cute little pig named Wilbur. It begins with a girl, Fern Arable, convincing her father to spare Wilbur, the runt of a litter. The reader is left to speculate as to Mr Arable’s intended method of killing the pig; was it... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Catch-22

If you’ve ever felt that the world is going down the drain and everyone is a big jerk, then Catch-22 will let you know you’re not alone. Set in World War II, on the Mediterranean island of Pianosa, this is a story of a disillusioned bombardier, Yossarian, trying to survive and make it home. Avoiding... Continue Reading →

Book Review: Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote is one of those literary works that has been almost upstaged by its adaptation to another medium. I’m referring of course to the song Breakfast at Tiffany’s by nineties rock band Deep Blue Something. It’s fun, catchy, and a welcome addition at any karaoke night. I’m sure Capote would... Continue Reading →

Short Fiction: On the Farm

 Every December when I was young, my family would pack two suitcases into the old station wagon and make the four-hour drive west to spend Christmas with my grandparents. Grandad and Nana lived on a farm. It was small compared to the neighbouring properties, but still big enough for us kids to have some great... Continue Reading →

Short Fiction: The Cold Valley

Frosted slopes, speckled with pines, gathered in gentle descent. Submerged beneath a sea of fog, the valley awoke from centuries of tranquil slumber. A fresh scar cut through the snow, deepening up to the crash site; scattered debris marked the unnatural intrusion. A shotgun blast roared then screamed away like a demon hound escaping the... Continue Reading →

Book Review: The Last of the Mohicans

James Fenimore Cooper’s most famous work cuts an epic path through the wild frontiers and forests of eighteenth century North America. Great Britain and France are battling for control of the New World, with each side making allies of Native American tribes. A group commanded by English Major Duncan Heywood is travelling to the fort... Continue Reading →

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